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How to See Live TV Shows

How to See Live TV Shows

Attend a taping of a sitcom, talk show, or game show

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No trip to Los Angeles is complete without a bit of Hollywood show business on your itinerary. Luckily, there are multiple opportunities to see a taping of your favorite television shows live to get a sneak peek of the TV magic you see at home. Plus, good news: tickets to the majority of shows are free.

Watch the casts of The Conners crack up the audience, be amazed by incredibly smart people on Jeopardy!, or laugh along with witty talk show hosts like Jimmy Kimmel or car karaoke star James Corden on The Late Late Show. If competition shows are more your style, try scoring tickets to The Voice or Dancing With the Stars, which both film in the Los Angeles area. Participating on a game show (like Wheel of Fortune) is feasible but typically involves a test or video submission in advance, so check the rules before planning your trip.

Being in the audience during a taping gives you a behind-the-scenes glimpse of how these shows are actually produced while providing a look at your favorite stars up close and personal—something that’s on every L.A. visitor’s bucket list. Each show has a specific ticket system that sometimes involves a wait list—or waiting in person—so be sure to plan far in advance and anticipate lines so you don’t miss your opportunity.

Be sure to get there early if you want a good seat (or any seat at all, as studios overbook the tickets), and expect to stay at least three hours, especially for sitcoms, which can take a long time as scenes get reworked and reshot. If you’re hoping for an on-camera appearance, do your homework ahead of time. What types of things is the show looking for? It might be a silly costume for a game show like Let’s Make a Deal, or it might be well-dressed people for a cameo appearance in a talk show. Also, be enthusiastic: employees sometimes tap the most eager audience members to be part of the show.

Between tapings—most take place in Burbank—fill your TV-loving vacation with studio tours at Warner Brothers and Universal Studios Hollywood, and visits to nearby L.A. neighborhoods that are pop culture staples in themselves. We’ve got tips on amazing things to do in Hollywood, as well as the celebrity-friendly communities Santa MonicaVenice BeachWest Hollywood, and the inimitable Beverly Hills.

Check out Discover Los Angeles' guide on how to attend live tapings for even more info.

Talk Shows & Competitions

Laugh and hear remarkable stories from guests with Kelly Clarkson on The Kelly Clarkson Show. See what movie stars are talking about on Jimmy Kimmel Live. Watch political wags and celebrities go toe-to-toe on Real Time With Bill Maher. And, as mentioned, on the grounds of Universal Studios Hollywood and adjacent Universal CityWalk, attend a taping to see Extra’s Billy Bush chat with celebs like Chris Evans and Demi Lovato.

Talk shows are a great way to see A-listers in person—usually dressed in on-trend fashions and perfectly coiffed. Another perk from sitting in the audience: you might get on TV too, since many talk shows include shots of the audience, or even pull one or two folks into the show for a gag or two. Glossy who’s-best shows like The Voice and America's Got Talent also let you see talent—some good, some bad—as well as A-list judges and performers.

Some shows distribute their own tickets via their websites; others use ticket agencies, such as 1iota. You may even get paid a stipend to be in the audience for shows like Safeword or Food Network Star.

Game Shows

Match wits with the contestants on Jeopardy! Spin the wheel with Vanna and Pat on Wheel of Fortune. Bring out your pom-poms and pork pie hats for Let’s Make a Deal. These game shows and other classics are mainstays in Los Angeles; most have been running for decades. Want to be a contestant? For some shows, that just means reserving a free ticket online and getting a callback to attend (then syncing up vacation plans), then crossing fingers that you’ll get picked from the audience. For some shows, it’s a little tougher to make the cut. For Jeopardy!, you’ve got to prove your prowess by passing a 50-question test either online or at a regional in-person screening. Wheel of Fortune asks for a video submission.

If you simply want to sit in the audience for popular game shows like Wheel of FortuneThe Price is Right, or Family Feud, check out On-Camera Audiences. Just keep in mind that show tapings are often overbooked, so a ticket is not always a guaranteed seat (show up a little early to keep your odds high). Most game shows require that audience members be at least 18, but both Wheel of Fortune and Jeopardy! welcome audience members as young as 8.

Sitcoms

Crack up at the hilarious extended-family dynamics of The Upshaws, or watch the antics of the cast of Lopez vs Lopez as the show is being filmed. Sitting in the audience while these and other sitcoms are staged gives you an incomparable behind-the-scenes take of all that goes into producing a professional comedy show. While familiar shows are a big draw and usually a good bet for a great show, don’t hesitate to take a chance on a pilot or a new show; you might wind up seeing the birth of the next hit sitcom or TV star.

The main resources for getting tickets are On Camera Audiences and 1Iota; their websites list TV shows offering tickets within the next 30 days at studios in the Los Angeles area. There are other sites, too, such as Shadow Casting, and OS | LA Productions. If you don’t score tickets when they are first released, additional and standby tickets may be released at a later date. Keep in mind, too, that the age minimum for most sitcom tapings is 18, and that tapings often last well beyond a half hour—often four hours—but it’s fun to watch the studio at work. And pack a sweater: studios are kept a little on the chilly side.

Insider Tips

Attending a TV show taping is a blast, but there are a few tips you can follow to make sure it’s memorable—and only in a good way.

1) Be sure to get there early if you want a good seat (or any seat at all, as studios overbook the tickets).

2) Expect to stay at least three hours, especially for sitcoms, which can take a long time as scenes get reworked and reshot. Bring a snack and a book for downtime. (At longer tapings, audience members might be treated to pizza, but don’t count on it.)

3) Bring a sweater; studios are kept notoriously cool to compensate for the hot lights on stage.

If you’re hoping for an on-camera appearance, do your homework ahead of time. What types of things is the show looking for? It might be a silly costume for a game show like Let’s Make a Deal, or it might be well-dressed people for a cameo appearance in a talk show. Also, be enthusiastic: employees sometimes tap the most eager audience members to be part of the show.

 

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