Kodiak Greenwood

5 Surfing Hot Spots

Maybe it’s the sun-streaked hair, the frequent smiles, the eyes always gazing west, looking to the horizon to see when the next set might roll in. It’s the unmistakable look and vibe of a California surf town, places that live and breathe for that next big break. Come, get a new bikini or board shorts, put your toes in the sand, and watch the action—or maybe catch it from your oceanfront balcony of your room or waterfront seat at lunchtime. Better yet, go for it yourself, and take a surf lesson. You got it now, dude.

Huntington Beach by Tom Story

Orange County Surfing & Surf Culture

Orange County Surfing & Surf Culture
Take a lesson or just watch pros carve it up

Orange County’s surfing tradition dates back more than 100 years when pioneering Hawaiian surfer George Freeth performed wave-riding demonstrations during the dedication of the new Huntington Beach Pier in 1914. In the 1920s, surfing and Olympic icon Duke Kahanamoku also surfed at the pier. But the sport really took off in the 1950s and the 1960s when Huntington Beach began hosting major events and emerged as the most important surfing city on the American mainland. As local surf legend Corky Carroll has said, “Orange County is the cultural centre of the surf world and Huntington Beach is like the heartbeat.”

Huntington Beach’s stores echo the theme. In front of Jack’s Surfboards, the Surfing Walk of Fame honours top surfers with engraved granite stones in the walkway, while nearby Huntington Surf and Sport immortalizes local surf legends with hand- and footprints in a Surfing Hall of Fame. See one of Duke Kahanamoku’s longboards at the International Surfing Museum.

Of course, there’s plenty of surfing in Orange County beyond Huntington Beach. Down at The O.C.’s far southern reaches are San Clemente and San Onofre State Beach (where top surfers ride the legendary breaks at Trestles). Back up the coast, see board-free daredevils bodysurfing at Newport Beach’s experts-only The Wedge.

Want to give surfing a try? Consider Corky Carroll’s Surf School in Huntington Beach or Bolsa Chica State Beach, or head south to San Clemente Surf School.

Photo by Tom Story

Malibu

Malibu
Explore a fabled beachfront town with real star power

Stretching for more than 32 miles/51 kilometres along the Pacific, Malibu is a beach town like no other. Hollywood stars and top athletes escape to oceanfront homes on long strands of beach with front row seats of surfers and unforgettable sunsets. Considered to have one of the most perfect waves anywhere, Malibu’s Surfrider Beach was named the first World Surfing Reserve; nearby Zuma Beach is a sun magnet for locals and families; aim for quieter weekdays if that’s your style.

You can shop for beach fashions, and maybe even spot one of local celebs, at the Malibu Country Mart and Malibu Lumber Yard, two adjacent and upscale retail centers. There’s dining and fishing on Malibu Pier (a great place to watch the action at Surfrider), and in winter, Point Dume at Malibu’s north end provides an ideal perch for spotting migrating gray whales.

Tough as it is to drag yourself away from the ocean, head inland a short distance and you can also hike through hills and canyons filled with spring wildflowers and even waterfalls on trails in Santa Monica Mountains National Recreation Area.

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San Diego Surfing & Surf Culture
San Diego by Dave Lauridsen

San Diego Surfing & Surf Culture

San Diego Surfing & Surf Culture
Try your hand at hangin’ 10—or at least get the look

Sometimes it seems as if everyone surfs in San Diego County. When the surf is up, there’s a steady stream of dudes (and plenty of dudettes, too) slipping into wetsuits too. When they’re not in the water or on the beach, they’re driving their cars, boards strapped to the rooftops, heading for such fabled breaks as Bird Rock, Oceanside Pier, and the legendary Windansea (featured in the Tom Wolfe bestseller, The Pump House Gang).

The California Surf Museum in Oceanside celebrates the county’s surfing tradition. Step inside to see historic boards and exhibits honoring legends who have carved the waves here. Throughout the county, especially in beach towns like Leucadia and Encinitas, you’ll find plenty of board shops, including Hansen Surfboards (open since 1961); stop by these venerable hangouts to get tips on local lessons. And even if you never plan to get in the waves, you can still buy a pair of board shorts and power up with breakfast at such classic surf hangouts as Pipes Cafe in Cardiff-by-the-Sea and Beach Break Cafe in Oceanside.

Rob Machado on San Diego's Beaches
Check out this pro surfer's favorite spots to catch a wave in San Diego.
Three most important things in life. Surf surf surf.
Jack O'Neill
Photo by Kodiak Greenwood

Huntington Beach

Huntington Beach
Catch a wave in Surf City, USA

The endless summer lives in Huntington Beach. Southern California’s beach culture thrives along this city’s curving shoreline, where you can bicycle down an oceanfront path, play volleyball, and, of course, surf. Surfing definitely sets the tone in Huntington Beach, and even if you never grab a board, there’s shopping at leading surf retailers and great viewing of some of the local dudes riding the waves alongside the landmark Huntington Pier.

From the pier, it’s just a short walk to Main Street’s stylish boutiques and restaurants, many with sidewalk tables or decks that let you bask in Huntington Beach’s fresh ocean breezes and sun-soaked afternoons. You can get a taste of the Surf City life with stays at Huntington Beach luxurious oceanfront resorts. Or discover more natural sides of town by trying horseback riding in 354-acre/143-hectare Huntington Central Park, and with bird watching and by exploring trails in Bolsa Chica Ecological Reserve, a restored wetlands and one of Southern California’s most vital coastal habitats.

Surfing Sculpture in Santa Cruz

Santa Cruz Surf Culture

Santa Cruz Surf Culture
Gnarly, dude! Explore the lore, trappings, and history of California's ultimate ocean sport

Few can resist the funky, sunny, life-lovin’ vibe of the surf culture in Santa Cruz.  Legend has it three Hawaiian princes brought surfing here in 1885, with legendary Hawaiian surfers such as Duke Kahanamoku following in their footsteps.  Locals soon took to the consistent, easy waves at Cowell’s, and right-handed point breaks at Steamer Lane and Pleasure Point, and they’ve been carving it up ever since. 

Thanks to local legend Jack O’Neill’s 1950s invention of the wetsuit to battle the Pacific’s notoriously chilly waters, newbies and experienced surfers alike can spend more time out there waiting for the perfect wave. If you want to give the sport a try, friendliest breaks are found at Cowell’s, next to the Santa Cruz Wharf; breakers fronting Capitola are usually novice-friendly too. Club Ed Surf School offers lessons for all abilities (kids too); equipment includes wide, easier-to-balance long boards and wetsuits).

To learn more about the local surf scene and its legends, visit the Santa Cruz Surfing Museum, quaintly housed in a former lighthouse along West Cliff Drive. Look over the seawall to see top surfers riding the break at Steamer Lane. And to chill out like a legend, visit the beachside Jack O’Neill Lounge at the Santa Cruz Dream Inn. Surrounded by surfing memorabilia and a great view of Monterey Bay, sip a signature cocktail, or ask for Jack’s favourite after-surf libation, a Ketel One Martini. In October, the O’Neill Coldwater Classic attracts many of the world’s best surfers.